Malarial Parasite Identification test

Know more about Malarial Parasite Identification test

Testing is performed to help diagnose malaria, to monitor for relapses, and to determine drug susceptibility of the parasite causing the infection.

Symptoms are: flu-like illness with fevers, chills, sweats, headaches, aches and malaise. Some people develop gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Anemia and jaundice can occur. 

Anti-malarial medication is taken to prevent infection (prophylaxis); not everyone traveling to endemic areas will require it. Use of the medication carries risk of side-effects so drugs, such as chloroquine, can be used after consideration of risk. Factors that must be considered include specific areas of travel, season of travel, type and length of travel, and each person's medical history. The type of medication recommended will depend on patterns of drug resistance and the individual's history. Plasmodium falciparum is becoming increasingly resistant to the most commonly prescribed anti-malarial medications such as chloroquine, so those traveling to areas where this type of malaria is common may be prescribed other anti-malarials, including mefloquine, atovaquone/Proguanil, and doxycycline. 

It is very important that the malarial prophylaxis be used as directed, including continuing the entire course for the prescribed amount of time, even after returning home from a trip, when exposure to malaria is no longer a risk. 

Determine your level of risk. Stay in well-screened areas at night Always use a bed-net impregnated with insecticides Use mosquito repellent Go for long sleeves Insect repellent again Sunscreen comes first - repellent second.

Early diagnosis and treatment is critical as malaria can be life-threatening. Travelers who develop symptoms of malaria during or after travel should seek medical attention as soon as possible. Because of the delayed nature of the signs and symptoms of malaria, healthcare providers need to take a thorough travel history of their patients. 

Treatment is guided by the type of Plasmodium causing the infection, the geographical area in which the infection was acquired (and local patterns of drug resistance), and how sick the person is. Pregnant and breastfeeding women and children require special consideration. People with uncomplicated malaria can be treated with oral medication; however, more severe disease requires that medication be administered directly into a vein (intravenous). 

Chloroquine is often used to treat malaria; however, other medication may be needed in cases of chloroquine-resistant infections. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends treatment, particularly for P. falciparum malaria, with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). 

Test Method 1 : Wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein. 

Clean the needle site with alcohoiPut the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed

Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood. 

Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collectedPut a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removedPut pressure on the site and then put on a bandage. 

Report available : Turn around time is 24 hours. 

A person have a following symptoms should get this done: flu-like illness with fevers, chills, sweats, headaches, aches and malaise. Some people develop gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Anemia and jaundice can occur.