Lipid Profile

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Test Description

This test is done to measure the amount of ñgoodî and ñbadî cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of fat, in your blood.

Symptoms are :   angina from heart disease. 

xanthomas, which are fatty skin deposits on the elbows, buttocks, knees, and tendons. 

cholesterol deposits around the eyelids, which are also known as xanthelasmas. 

cholesterol deposits around the corneas, also known as corneal arcus

Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood. Ideal results for most adults are:

LDL: 70 to 130 mg/dL (the lower the number, the better)

HDL: more than 40 to 60 mg/dL (the higher the number, the better)

total cholesterol: less than 200 mg/dL (the lower the number, the better)

triglycerides: 10 to 150 mg/dL (the lower the number, the better)

If your cholesterol numbers are outside of the normal range, you may be at a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, and atherosclerosis. If your test results are abnormal, your doctor may order a blood glucose test to check for diabetes. Your doctor might also order a thyroid function test to determine if your thyroid is underactive.

You can lower your cholesterol by eating a healthy balanced diet that's low in saturated fat exercising regularly not smoking and cutting down on alcohol. If you have an unhealthy diet that's high in fat fatty plaques are much more likely to build up in your arteries. This is because fatty foods contain cholesterol.

Test Method 1 : A blood sample is needed. 

The blood sample is sent to a lab. A lipid profile typically includes:

Total cholesterol

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) „ often called "good cholesterol" because it removes excess cholesterol and carries it to the liver for removal.

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) „ often called "bad cholesterol" because it deposits excess cholesterol in walls of blood vessels, which can contribute to atherosclerosis.

Triglycerides

Report available : Turn around time is 24 hours. 

Treatments for pure hypercholesterolemia often depend upon how severe the cholesterol levels and symptoms are. Almost all people with the condition will need to take a prescription medication to reduce overall cholesterol levels. 

The most common medications are called "statins. " An example is atorvastatin. 

blood test

A blood test may be used to detect a person's cholesterol levels. Genetic testing may be used to determine pure hypercholesterolemia. 

Sometimes doctors will prescribe additional medications known to lower cholesterol, such 

bile acid sequestrant resins

ezetimibe

nicotinic acid (niacin)

gemfibrozil

fenofibrate

People with severely high cholesterol levels may also need to undergo a procedure called LDL-apheresis. This process involves the removal of excess cholesterol from the blood. It is performed on a weekly or twice-weekly basis.

A person have a following symptoms should get this done: angina from heart disease. 

xanthomas, which are fatty skin deposits on the elbows, buttocks, knees, and tendons. 

cholesterol deposits around the eyelids, which are also known as xanthelasmas. 

cholesterol deposits around the corneas, also known as corneal arcus

Gender : Mainly occurs in men and women. 

Age : Mainly occurs at the age of 35 to 50

Socio Geographic : It is predominant all over the world specially in asian countries. 

Heart, chest
Cardivascular disease, Chest pain, Stroke.