Chlamydia, IgG Antibody test

Rs 449
Add To Cart Loading

Know more about Chlamydia, IgG Antibody test

This test employs immunofluorescence to detect IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae in human serum. C pneumoniae has been implicated as one of the agents of atypical pneumonia and may be responsible for as many as 10% of all hospitalized and outpatient cases of pneumonia.

Symptoms in men can include: 

Discharge from the penis

Burning/itching sensation during urination

Pain/swelling in one or both testicles (less common)

Symptoms in women can include: 

Abnormal vaginal discharge

Burning sensation during urination

Pain during intercourse (less common)

Abdominal pain (less common)

Bleeding between periods (less common)

The surest way for a sexually active person to avoid contracting chlamydia is to use a condom during sexual intercourse, unless you're absolutely certain your partner isn't carrying the infection. You should either avoid having oral sex, or use protection during oral sex, until you know the other person doesn't have chlamydia. 

Use protection with each new partner and get tested for chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases between each new partner. 

The best prevention for genital infection by chlamydia is to avoid sexual contact with an infected person. Abstaining from sexual relations is the only certain way to avoid contracting Chlamydia trachomatis since it is common for infected people not to know they have the infection. Parrot fever can be prevented by buying birds from reputable pet stores or breeders who sell imported birds that have been quarantined * , examined, and fed antibiotic-treated bird feed for 45 days. * cornea (KOR-ne-a) is the transparent structure covering the front chamber of the eye, * quarantine is the enforced isolation (for a fixed period) of apparently well persons or animals who may have been exposed to infectious disease.

Chlamydia can be treated and cured with antibiotics. Individuals diagnosed with chlamydia should abstain from sexual activity for one week upon finishing antibiotics. You can become infected with chlamydia again after being cured. This is why it is crucial for partners of those who have chlamydia to also get tested (and treated if found positive) for chlamydia. Chlamydia often occurs alongside gonorrhea (another bacterial STD). If you have one of these STDs, you might have the other because the risk factors are very similar. Getting tested for both is important. 

 

Whether or not symptoms are present, testing or screening for chlamydia can be done as early as 24 hours after exposure. The incubation times varies from person-to-person; for the most accurate results, get tested two weeks after initial exposure. If you test positive for chlamydia, it is advised to get retested two weeks after completing treatment to be sure that all of the Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria is cleared from your system. 

Test Method 1 : Urine samples (recommended test method)

Testing via urine samples need to consist of first-catch urine (approximately 20-30mL of the initial urine stream). Patients should not include more than the first-catch in the collection cup to avoid diluting the sample. 

Patients should not urinate for at least one hour prior to providing a sample. 

Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. 

Swab cultures

 

Endocervical swab

Male urethral swab

Vaginal swab

Rectal swab

Pharyngeal swab (throat swab) if the throat is infected

Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA)

 

Swab cultures

Endocervical swab

Male urethral swab

Rectal swab

Neonates conjunctival swab

Report available : Turn around time is 5 to 7 days. 

The person have the following symptoms should get this down:   Symptoms in men can include: 

 

Discharge from the penis

Burning/itching sensation during urination

Pain/swelling in one or both testicles (less common)

Symptoms in women can include: 

 

Abnormal vaginal discharge

Burning sensation during urination

Pain during intercourse (less common)

Abdominal pain (less common)

Bleeding between periods (less common)