Catecholamines, Urine test

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Know more about Catecholamines, Urine test

Catecholamines testing may be used in follow up to plasma free metanephrines and/or urine metanephrines testing to help confirm or rule out rare tumors called pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in symptomatic people. It also may be ordered when a tumor is treated or removed to monitor for recurrence.

Signs and symptoms are: 

High blood pressure (hypertension), especially when a person has hypertension that is not responding to treatment, as people with pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are frequently resistant to conventional therapies

Severe headaches

Sweating

Flushing

Rapid heart rate (palpitations)

Tremor

Tests used for determining the presence of catecholamine-secreting tumors (pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas) include plasma catecholamines, urine catecholamines, plasma free metanephrines and urine metanephrines. These tests measure either the catecholamines or their metabolites (metanephrines) and have varying sensitivity and specificity. Current guidelines recommend plasma free metanephrines or urinary fractionated metanephrines for initial biochemical testing. The healthcare provider may, however, select any one (or more than one) depending on the person's presentation, family history, and/or genetic profile. 

A variety of medications can interfere with catecholamines testing. However, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider before discontinuing any prescribed medications. Your healthcare provider will work with you to identify potentially interfering substances and drug treatments and to determine which of them can be safely interrupted and which must be continued for your well-being.

You may have different types of doctors on your treatment team, depending on the stage of your cancer and your treatment options. These doctors could include: 

 

A urologist: a surgeon who specializes in treating diseases of the urinary system (and male reproductive system)

A radiation oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with radiation therapy

A medical oncologist: a doctor who treats cancer with medicines such as chemotherapy

Many other specialists might be part of your treatment team as well, including physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, physical therapists, social workers, and other health professionals. See Health Professionals Associated With Cancer Care for more on this. 

 

It's important to discuss all of your treatment options as well as their possible side effects with your doctors to help make the decision that best fits your needs. 

Test Method 1 : After you urinate into a sterile container, the sample is either tested in the doctor's office using chemically treated paper or sent to a laboratory for analysis. 

Report available : Turn arround time is 24 hours. 

A person have the following signs and symptoms should get this done: 

High blood pressure (hypertension), especially when a person has hypertension that is not responding to treatment, as people with pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are frequently resistant to conventional therapies

Severe headaches

Sweating

Flushing

Rapid heart rate (palpitations)

Tremor

Hypertension, Myocardial infarction, adrenal glands tumor, Neuroblastoma, Progressive Muscular Dystrophy, Myastheni gravis, Physical exhaustion, Hypothyroidism, diuretic therapy, Cushing's Syndrome