C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Quantitative

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Test Description

The C-reactive protein (CRP) test is used by a health practitioner to detect inflammation. CRP is an acute phase reactant, a protein made by the liver and released into the blood within a few hours after tissue injury, the start of an infection, or other cause of inflammation. The CRP test is not diagnostic of any condition, but it can be used together with signs and symptoms and other tests to evaluate an individual for an acute or chronic inflammatory condition. For example, CRP may be used to detect or monitor significant inflammation in an individual who is suspected of having an acute condition, such as: A serious bacterial infection like sepsis A fungal infection Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) The CRP test is useful in monitoring people with chronic inflammatory conditions to detect flare-ups and/or to determine if treatment is effective. Some examples include: Inflammatory bowel disease Some forms of arthritis Autoimmune diseases, such as lupus or vasculitis CRP may sometimes be ordered along with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), another test that detects inflammation. While the CRP test is not specific enough to diagnose a particular disease, it does serve as a general marker for infection and inflammation, thus alerting health practitioners that further testing and treatment may be necessary. Depending on the suspected cause, a number of other tests may be performed to identify the source of inflammation.

It may be ordered, for example, when a newborn shows signs of infection or when an individual has symptoms of sepsis, such as fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate. 

It may also be ordered on a regular basis to monitor conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus and is often repeated at intervals to determine whether treatment is effective. This is particularly useful for inflammation problems since CRP levels drop as inflammation subsides. 

C-reactive protein levels are measured via a blood test. There are two tests for elevated CRP. One can show a non-specific elevation of CRP that occurs with general inflammatory changes in the body. The other test, hs-CRP, is a measure of inflammation in blood vessels. This is the test needed to help establish heart disease risk. 

In evaluating cardiac risk, physicians look at a very narrow range of C-reactive protein levels, from zero to 3. 0 and above. This requires a special test called high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which may be able to reveal inflammation at the micro-vascular level. If this test shows that CRP is less than 1. 0 mg per liter of blood, the risk of heart disease is considered low; if it is between 1. 0 and 3. 0, the risk is average; and if it is above 3. 0, the risk is deemed high. 

An anti-inflammatory diet that includes two to three servings of fish such as salmon or sardines per week. If you don't eat fish, he suggests taking fish oil supplements. He also recommends taking anti-inflammatory herbs including ginger and turmeric and following your doctor's recommendations for heart health. That means quitting smoking, watching your diet (particularly avoid foods that predominantly consist of flour and/or sugar), and getting regular exercise: research indicates that as fitness levels decline, C-reactive protein levels go up.

Test Method 1 : The health professional taking a sample of your blood will: 

 

Wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood. This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein. 

Clean the needle site with alcohol. 

Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. 

Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood. 

Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected. 

Put a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed. 

Put pressure on the site and then put on a bandage. 

Report available : Turn around for the C-Reactive Protein Quantitative test is typically 1 business day. 

Conventional physicians may prescribe the same (statin) drugs used to lower LDL cholesterol to also lower levels of CRP. In addition, they will typically recommend exercise and weight loss where appropriate, since both can help lower CRP levels. In general, conventional physicians recommend the same lifestyle changes shown to reduce heart disease _ diet, exercise, not smoking, drinking less alcohol, following a heart-healthy diet _ to lower elevated C-reactive protein levels. 

The persons have the following signs and symptom:    It may be ordered, for example, when a newborn shows signs of infection or when an individual has symptoms of sepsis, such as fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate. 

 

It may also be ordered on a regular basis to monitor conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus and is often repeated at intervals to determine whether treatment is effective. This is particularly useful for inflammation problems since CRP levels drop as inflammation subsides. 

Gender : Mainly occurs in men and women. 

Age : Mainly occurs at the age of 40 to 65. 

Socio Geographic : It is predominant all over the world. 

Heart, joints
Cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Infection, Rheumatoid arthritis, Lupus