Blood Grouping (A,B,O) and Rh factor test

Know more about Blood Grouping (A,B,O) and Rh factor test

This test is done to determine a person's blood type. Health care providers need to know your blood type when you get a blood transfusion or transplant, because not all blood types are compatible with each other.

Symptoms of Rh diseases are: 

A mother has no physical signs of Rh disease, but her Rh positive baby can have problems if the mother has developed antibodies. The following are the most common symptoms of Rh disease in the fetus. However, each pregnancy may have different symptoms of the condition. Symptoms may include: 

With amniocentesis, the amniotic fluid may have a yellow coloring and contain bilirubin. 

Ultrasound of the fetus shows enlarged liver, spleen, or heart and fluid build up in the fetus' abdomen. 

The symptoms of Rh disease may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis. 

The results of blood typing will determine if a person is type A, B, AB, or O and if he or she is Rh negative or positive. The results will tell the healthcare provider what blood or blood components will be safe for the person to receive.Blood typing results will show whether a pregnant woman is Rh positive or negative. This information will indicate whether she may be a candidate for receiving Rh immune globulin, which would prevent her from developing antibodies against her fetus' blood cells.

Typing of donated blood is important because this information allows health practitioners to determine which patients are compatible and can safely receive that blood.

Similarly, when a donor organ, tissue, or bone marrow is compatible with the intended recipient, it is less likely to be rejected in the immediate post-transplant period.

Fortunately, HDN is a very preventable disease. Because of the advances in prenatal care, nearly all women with Rh negative blood are identified in early pregnancy by blood testing. If a mother is Rh negative, she will be tested for Rh antibody titers. If she has not been sensitized, she is usually given a drug called Rh immunoglobulin (RhIg), also known as RhoGAM. This is a specially-developed blood product that can prevent an Rh negative mother's antibodies from being able to react to Rh positive cells. Many women are also given RhIg around the 28th week of pregnancy, unless the mother has vaginal bleeding, trauma, or an amniocentesis before 28 weeks. After the baby is born, a woman should receive a second dose of the drug within 72 hours if the baby is Rh positive. RhIg destroys any anti-Rh antibodies that enter in the mother's circulation before her immune system becomes sensitized. This helps protect a future Rh positive baby.

Your doctor may not treat your anemia until the underlying cause has been established. The treatment for one type of anemia may be both inappropriate and dangerous for another type of anemia. If you suddenly lose a large volume of blood, you may be treated with fluids, a blood transfusion, oxygen, and possibly iron to help your body build new red blood cells. Chronic blood loss is treated by identifying the source of bleeding, stopping the bleeding, and, if necessary, providing treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. 

 

Anemia Caused by Decreased Red Blood Cell Production 

The type of treatment you receive depends on the cause of decreased red blood cell production. 

Test Method 1 : Blood is drawn from a vein, usually from the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. The puncture site is cleaned with a germ-killing product. An elastic band is placed around the upper arm to apply pressure, which causes the vein to swell with blood. 

A needle is inserted into the vein, and the blood is collected into a tube. During the procedure, the elastic band is removed to restore circulation. Once the blood has been collected, the needle is removed, and a band-aid or gauze is applied. 

In infants or young children, the area is cleansed with antiseptic and punctured with a sharp needle or a lancet. The blood may be collected in a pipette (small glass tube), on a slide, onto a test strip, or into a small container. A bandage may be applied if there is any bleeding. 

The test to determine your blood group is called ABO typing. Your blood sample is mixed with antibodies against type A and B blood, and the sample is checked to see whether or not the blood cells stick together (agglutinate). If blood cells stick together, it means the blood reacted with one of the antibodies. 

The second step is called back typing. The liquid part of your blood without cells (serum) is mixed with blood that is known to be type A and type B. Persons with type A blood have anti-B antibodies, and those with type B blood have anti-A antibodies. Type O blood contains both types of antibodies. These two steps can accurately determine your blood type. 

Blood typing is also done to tell whether or not you have a substance called Rh factor on the surface of your red blood cells. If you have this substance, you are considered Rh (positive). Those without it are considered Rh- (negative). Rh typing uses a method similar to ABO typing. 

Report available : Turn around time is 24 hours. 

The persons have the folloing symptoms should get this done:   Symptoms of Rh diseases are: 

A mother has no physical signs of Rh disease, but her Rh positive baby can have problems if the mother has developed antibodies. The following are the most common symptoms of Rh disease in the fetus. However, each pregnancy may have different symptoms of the condition. Symptoms may include: 

With amniocentesis, the amniotic fluid may have a yellow coloring and contain bilirubin. 

Ultrasound of the fetus shows enlarged liver, spleen, or heart and fluid build up in the fetus' abdomen. 

The symptoms of Rh disease may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis.