Hypertension – As serious as the name!

Key points covered in this article

Introduction to Hypertension

What is hypertension?

So how to detect it?

Conclusion

 

Introduction to Hypertension

Hypertension. Ever heard that term or used it for your state of mind when under stress? Either way, it does ring a bell – and it should. Stress and hypertension isn’t linked as per studies so far. However, taking steps to reduce your stress can improve your health as well as keep your hypertension in check.

What is hypertension?

Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure, which is a common lifestyle disease today. Hypertension is one of the most common lifestyle diseases today, with every third person we meet, having suffered from it. And experts say that even kids can be victims of high blood pressure. The fact is that in 90% patients there is no known cause for hypertension and this makes it even more important to be alert.

Hypertension

Most are not even aware that they have hypertension,which makes the scenario rather grim.What makes it a high-alert situation is the fact that one person of every three we meet has suffered or is prone to suffering from it. A bigger reason of concern is the fact that most people aren’t aware of their condition when they’re suffering. Blood pressure normally rises and falls throughout the day, but can cause health problems if it stays high for a long time. High BP can lead to heart disease and stroke

There are two ways to determine or define blood pressure, namely, the amount of blood pumped by the heart and the amount of resistance to blood flow. Blood pressure normally rises and falls through the day, but if it stays high for a long time, it can lead to heart disease and stroke. Hypertension is one of the most common lifestyle diseases today, with every third person we meet, having suffered from it. And experts say that even kids can be victims of high blood pressure.Hypertension is one of the most common lifestyle diseases today, with every third person we meet, having suffered from it. And experts say that even kids can be victims of high blood pressure.

If we talk numbers, hypertension is defined as having a blood pressure more than 140 over 90 mmHg (millimeters of mercury)—the pressure as the heart pumps blood around the body is over 140 mmHg and the pressure as the heart relaxes and refills with blood is over 90 mmHg.

Uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to anything from weakened and narrowed blood vessels in your kidneys, metabolic syndrome, trouble with memory, thickened, narrowed or torn blood vessels in the eyes and aneurysm to heart failure.

How to detect Hypertension?

As it’s a lifestyle disease, a sedentary lifestyle, faulty food habits, smoking and lack of exercise are responsible for hypertension, but even the genetics play a major role here. Here are a few more factors or actions that may trigger hypertension, and should be paid heed to.

Men versus women:

The risk will increase as you age. Men are likely to develop high blood pressure at 45 while women after the age of 65. However, according to the WHO, hypertension affects 50% of women over 65, compared with only 30% of men in that group.

Family history:

High blood pressure tends to run in families.

Obesity:

The more you weigh the more blood you need to supply oxygen and nutrient to your tissues, putting more pressure on the artery walls.

Tobacco:

The chemicals in tobacco damages the lining of artery walls.

Excess of salt or sodium:

Excessive sodium in your diet can cause your body to retain fluid, which increases the blood pressure.

Deficiency of Potassium:

Potassium is responsible for balancing the amount of sodium in your cells, which helps control blood pressure.

Low Vitamin D:

A deficiency of Vitamin D may affect an enzyme produced by your kidneys that affects your blood pressure.

Hypertension

Conclusion

If you are diagnosed with hypertension, remember to modify your lifestyle to achieve better control. Of course, if you maintain a healthy lifestyle in the first place, you will discourage it from developing. So what changes should you make? Eat a balanced diet, stop smoking, reduce your alcohol consumption and make it a point to exercise for at least 30 minutes, which will lower your blood pressure by 5 to 10mm Hg. And trust the advice of your doctor. Regular checkups aren’t overrated.

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