How often should blood sugar levels get tested?

Sugar level

Understanding the basics of diabetes is the first step in gaining control of your health. After we eat, blood sugar concentrations rise. The pancreas releases insulin automatically so that the glucose enters cells. As more and more cells receive glucose, blood sugar levels return to normal again. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen, or stored glucose, in the liver and the muscles.

Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. Blood sugar levels are literally the amount of glucose in the blood, sometimes called the serum glucose level. Usually, this amount is expressed as millimoles per liter (mmol/l) and stay stable amongst people without diabetes at around 4-8mmol/L. Spikes in blood sugar will occur following meals, and levels will usually be at their lowest in the early mornings. When it comes to people with diabetes, blood sugar fluctuates more widely.

Understand the high-low of glucose

When glucose levels get higher than normal, they start to cause inflammation in blood vessels and nerves. This is where all the complications of diabetes come from. High blood sugar usually comes on slowly.

sugar levels

It happens when you don’t have enough insulin in your body. High blood sugar can happen if you miss taking your diabetes medicine, eat too much, or don’t get enough exercise. Sometimes, medicines you take for other problems may cause high blood sugar. Your blood sugar level is too high then you feel very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body.

In people without diabetes, normal insulin function keeps sugars in a normal range. When you have diabetes, insulin function is damaged. You need to give your body conscious help, by eating right, exercising, taking medications or herbs, and reducing stress.

Low blood sugars :

Are also a potential problem. If you take insulin or a sulfonylurea or meglitinide drug, there is a risk of your blood sugar going too low. Low blood sugar (“hypoglycemia,” pronounced high-po-gleye-SEEM-e-uh) can cause dizziness, confusion, or fainting. A low blood sugar reaction can come on fast. It is caused by taking too much insulin, missing a meal, delaying a meal, exercising too much, or drinking too much alcohol. Sometimes, medicines you take for other health problems can cause blood sugar to drop. You can prevent most low blood sugar reactions by eating your meals on time, taking your diabetes medicine, and testing your blood sugar often. Testing your blood will show if your sugar level is going down. You can then take steps, like eating some fruit, crackers, or other snack, to raise your blood sugar level.

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Normal blood glucose numbers

Fasting:

Normal for a person without diabetes: 70–99 mg/dl (3.9–5.5 mmol/L)
Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes: 80–130 mg/dl (4.4–7.2 mmol/L)

2 hours after meals:

Normal for a person without diabetes: Less than 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L)
Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes: Less than 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/L)

HbA1c

Normal for a person without diabetes: Less than 5.7%
Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes: Less than 7.0%

Blood sugar levels testing

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care.

Why test your blood sugar

  • Blood sugar testing or self-monitoring blood glucose provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you.
  • Judge how well you’re reaching overall treatment goals.

sugar levels

  • Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels
  • Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels
  • Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels
  • Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low

Actually, the doctor will advise you how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan.

Type 1 diabetes:

Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to 10 times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and sometimes during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication.

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Type 2 diabetes:

If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing a few times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you use.

Testing is usually, recommended before meals and at bedtime if you’re taking multiple daily injections. You may need to test only twice daily, before breakfast and dinner if you only use a long-acting insulin. If you manage type 2 diabetes with noninsulin medications or with diet and exercise alone, you may not need to test your blood sugar daily.

Conclusion

It’s never easy to be, handed a diabetes diagnosis. Most of the food you consume will be digested and raises blood glucose in one to two hours. To capture the peak level of your blood glucose, it is best to test one to two hours after you start eating. Talk with your doctor about how often you need to record your blood sugar results. Many devices can now be, downloaded to a computer.

When you manually log your results, record the date, time, test results, medication and dose, and diet and exercise information. Bring your record of results with you to all appointments with your doctor. Talk to your doctor about what to do and when to call when you get results that don’t fall within the range of your target goals.

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