Beta 2 Glycoprotein 1 IgM test

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Know more about Beta 2 Glycoprotein 1 IgM test

Beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody tests and other antiphospholipid antibody testing may be ordered when a person's symptoms suggest a blood clot in a vein or artery. Symptoms may include pain and swelling in the extremities, shortness of breath, and headaches. Beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody tests may also be ordered when a woman has had recurrent miscarriages or when a person has signs and symptoms of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), such as: Persistent headaches Stroke Pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia Chest pain Shortness of breath Speech and/or cognitive changes Seizures Memory loss A beta-2 glycoprotein 1 IgA antibody test may sometimes be ordered when initial antiphospholipid antibody testing for the IgG and IgM class is negative but suspicion of APS is still strong. When one of the antibody tests is positive, it will be repeated at least 12 weeks later to determine whether the antibody is temporary or persistent. When a person with an autoimmune disorder tests negative for beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody, testing may be repeated periodically to screen for antibody development.

Common manifestations of a thrombotic disorder include unexplained deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (PE). Superficial thrombophlebitis can also develop. Other consequences may include arterial thrombosis (eg, causing stroke or mesenteric ischemia). Symptoms depend on the location of the clot, as in the following examples: 

 

Chest pain and shortness of breath: Possible PE

 

Leg warmth, redness, and swelling: DVT

 

Weakness/numbness of one side of the body, problems speaking, and problems with balance and walking: Possible ischemic stroke

 

Abdominal pain: Possible mesenteric ischemia

 

Women may have a history of multiple spontaneous abortions.

In this test anti Beta-2 glycoprotein antibody 1 is detected in the patient's blood. A positive beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody test may indicate that the person has antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), as they are most frequently seen with the condition. Current diagnostic criteria for APS are based upon both clinical findings and the persistent presence of one or more antiphospholipid antibodies. If a high level of beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody is detected initially and then again 12 weeks later in a person with signs of APS, then it is likely that the person has the disorder. This is especially true if other antiphospholipid antibodies are also detected. 

 

If a person is negative for beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies but positive for other antiphospholipid antibodies and has signs and symptoms, then that person also likely has APS. 

 

If the test is weakly to moderately positive for beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies and weakly positive or negative for other antiphospholipid antibodies, then the antibody presence may be due to a condition other than APS. If subsequent testing is negative, then it is likely that the antibodies were temporary. This may be seen with an acute infection. 

 

A single positive beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibody result is not diagnostic of APS, and a negative result does not rule out antiphospholipid antibody development. They just indicate the presence or absence of the antibody at the time of testing. That is why a diagnosis of APS requires clinical symptoms plus at least two positive tests for an antiphospholipid antibody at least 12 weeks apart. 

 

If a person with another autoimmune disorder, such as lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), has beta-2 glycoprotein antibodies, they may increase the risk of developing a clot in a blood vessel.

Not much of precautions is needed. only you have to avoid the direct contact with blood of the patient. moreover, the patient may feel pain while drawing the blood out in blood tests. Other imaging techniques do not require any special precautions.

Patients who persistently test positive for either a lupus anticoagulant or anticardioplipin antibodies (ACA) and have a thrombotic history appear to be at increased risk for recurrent thrombosis (~50% over a 5-year period). Treatment is reserved for patients who have clinical evidence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). If an individual initially experiences a venous thrombotic event, the subsequent recurrence is typically venous. The intensity of oral anticoagulation (INR 2 to 3) required to suppress venous recurrence remains controversial. In general, patients with APS should be treated more aggressively with oral anticoagulants (high intensity) with an INR goal of 2. 5 to 3. 5. 2 Treatment of patients with transiently positive ACA or a lupus anticoagulant is not required.

Test Method 1 : The Beta-2 glycoprotens antibody test is a blood test. A nurse or technician will draw your blood from a vein near your elbow or hand. This blood will be collected in a tube and sent to a lab for analysis. There the presence or absence of antibody is detected. 

 

Your doctor will contact you to explain your results when they become available. 

Report available : The turn around time for this test is around 24 hours.

A person with the following symptoms should get this test done. 

Chest pain and shortness of breath: Possible PE

Leg warmth, redness, and swelling: DVT

Weakness/numbness of one side of the body, problems speaking, and problems with balance and walking: Possible ischemic stroke

Abdominal pain: Possible mesenteric ischemia

Women may have a history of multiple spontaneous abortions.