Anti CCP-Anti Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibody test

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Know more about Anti CCP-Anti Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibody test

A CCP antibody test is primarily ordered along with an RF test when someone has signs and symptoms that may be due to previously undiagnosed inflammatory arthritis or has been diagnosed with undifferentiated arthritis. It may be ordered as a follow-up test to a negative RF test when clinical signs and symptoms lead a health practitioner to suspect RA. RA usually affects multiple joints symmetrically. Signs and symptoms may include: Painful, warm, swollen joints of the hands and wrists most commonly Pain sometimes affecting elbows, neck, shoulders, hips, knees, and/or feet Stiffness of affected joints in the morning that improves during the course of the day Fatigue Fever Development of nodules under the skin, especially at the elbows A general feeling of being unwell (malaise)

 

Joint pain

Joint tenderness

Joint swelling

Joint redness

Joint warmth

Joint stiffness

Loss of joint range of motion

Many joints affected (polyarthritis)

Limping

Joint deformity

Both sides of the body affected (symmetric)

Loss of joint function

Anemia

Fever

Presence of CCP antibody in the patient result in the positive test. When people with signs and symptoms of arthritis are positive for both CCP antibody and RF, it is very likely that they have RA and it is likely that they may develop a more rapidly progressive and severe form of the disease. When people are positive for CCP antibody but not RF, or have low levels of both, and have clinical signs that suggest RA, then it is likely that they have early RA or that they will develop RA in the future. 

 

When individuals are negative for CCP antibody but have a positive RF, then the clinical signs and symptoms are more vital in determining whether they have RA or some other inflammatory condition. When someone is negative for both CCP antibody and RF, then it is less likely that the person has RA. It must be emphasized, however, that RA is a clinical diagnosis and may be made in the absence of positive tests for autoantibodies.

Not much of precautions is needed. only you have to avoid the direct contact with blood of the patient. moreover, the patient may feel pain while drawing the blood out in blood tests. Other imaging techniques do not require any special precautions.

Medications

NSAIDs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. 

Steroids, Corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone, reduce inflammation and pain and slow joint damage. . . . 

Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). . . . 

Biologic agents. The joint replacement therapy is also available.

Test Method 1 : Anti-CCP is a blood test. A blood sample is drawn from the patient and analyzed in a lab. If the sample finds the presence of anti-CCP at a certain level, the result is positive. 

Low levels of anti-CCP can be found in the test results of certain patients but may not enough to produce a positive result. Re-testing later on may be required in patients who continue to display clinical rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. 

Report available : The turn around time for this test is around 24 hours.

A person with the following symptoms of arthritis should get this test done. Fatigue

Joint pain

Joint tenderness

Joint swelling

Joint redness

Joint warmth

Joint stiffness

Loss of joint range of motion

Many joints affected (polyarthritis)

Limping

Joint deformity

Both sides of the body affected (symmetric)

Loss of joint function

Anemia

Fever