Alanine Aminotransferase (SGPT) test

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Know more about Alanine Aminotransferase (SGPT) test

The ALT test is usually used to determine whether someone has liver injury or failure. Your doctor may order an ALT test if you’re having symptoms of liver disease, including: jaundice, which is yellowing of the eyes or skin dark urine nausea vomiting right upper quadrant abdominal pain Liver damage generally causes an increase in ALT levels. The ALT test can evaluate the levels of ALT in the bloodstream, but it can’t show how much liver damage there is or how much fibrosis, or scarring, is present. The test also can’t predict how severe the liver damage will become. An ALT test is often done along with other liver enzyme tests. Checking ALT levels along with levels of other liver enzymes can provide your doctor with more specific information about a liver problem. An ALT test may also be performed to: monitor the progression of liver diseases, such as hepatitis or liver failure assess whether treatment for liver disease should be started evaluate how well treatment is working

Signs and symptoms of liver disease include: 

Skin and eyes that appear yellowish (jaundice)

Abdominal pain and swelling. 

Swelling in the legs and ankles. 

Itchy skin. 

Dark urine color. 

Pale stool color, or bloody or tar-colored stool. 

Chronic fatigue. 

Nausea or vomiting.

In this test serum ALT level is measured. The normal value for ALT in blood is between 7 and 55 units per liter, but this value can vary depending on the hospital. This range can be affected by certain factors, including gender and age. It’s important to discuss your specific results with your doctor. 

 

Abnormal results

Higher-than-normal levels of ALT can indicate liver damage. Increased levels of ALT may be a result of: 

 

hepatitis, which is an inflammatory condition of the liver

cirrhosis, which is severe scarring of the liver

death of liver tissue

a tumor or cancer in the liver

a lack of blood flow to the liver

hemochromatosis, which is a disorder that causes iron to build up in the body

mononucleosis, which is an infection usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus

pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

If your test results indicate liver damage or disease, you may need more testing to determine the underlying cause of the problem and the best way to treat it.

Blood tests are normally well-tolerated. Some people have smaller or larger veins, which may make taking a blood sample more difficult. However, risks associated with blood tests like the ACTH hormone test are rare. Uncommon risks of having blood drawn include: excessive bleeding lightheadedness or fainting hematoma, or blood pooling under the skin infection at the site

If detected early enough, acute liver failure caused by an overdose of acetaminophen can sometimes be treated and its effects reversed. Likewise, if a virus causes liver failure, supportive care can be given at a hospital to treat the symptoms until the virus runs its course. In these cases, the liver will sometimes recover on its own. 

 

For liver failure that is the result of long-term deterioration, the initial treatment goal may be to save whatever part of the liver is still functioning. If this is not possible, then a liver transplant is required. Fortunately, liver transplant is a common procedure that is often successful. 

Test Method 1 : A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand. 

In infants or young children, a sharp tool called a lancet may be used to puncture the skin. 

The blood collects in a small glass tube called a pipette, or onto a slide or test strip. 

A bandage is put over the spot to stop any bleeding. Amount of alanine transaminase is determined in blood. 

Report available : The Turn around time for this test is around 24 hours.

A person with the following Signs and symptoms of liver disease should get this test done. 

Skin and eyes that appear yellowish (jaundice)

Abdominal pain and swelling. 

Swelling in the legs and ankles. 

Itchy skin. 

Dark urine color. 

Pale stool color, or bloody or tar-colored stool. 

Chronic fatigue. 

Nausea or vomiting.